ITIL Intermediate OSA - Functions and Roles Tutorial

Functions and Roles

Welcome to lesson 8 ‘Functions and Roles’ of the ITIL Intermediate OSA Tutorial, which is a part of the ITIL Intermediate OSA Certification Course. This lesson is all about the various functions and roles related to OSA.

Let us begin with the objectives of this lesson.

Objectives

By the end of this ‘Functions and Roles’ lesson, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the various OSA functions which are technical management, IT operations management, and applications management.

  • Describe the design strategy, objectives, components, activities, roles and operation including its organizational structure and interfaces with other processes.

  • Explain the roles within each OSA process and generic roles

The next section provides detail on function.

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What are Functions?

A function is a logical concept that refers to the people and automated measures that execute a defined process, an activity or a combination of processes or activities. In larger organizations, a function may be broken up and performed by several departments, teams, and groups, or it may be embodied within a single organizational unit.

The following picture shows the 4 functions and their corresponding sub-functions.

The Service Operations Functions includes:

  • Service Desk

  • Technical Management

  • IT Operations

  • Application Management.

These functions can be described as follows:

Service Desk

It is the primary point of contact for users when there is a service disruption, for service requests or even for some categories of Request for Change. The Service Desk provides a point of communication to the users and a point of coordination for several IT groups and processes.

To enable them to perform these actions effectively the Service Desk is usually separate from the other Service Operation functions. In some cases, e.g. where detailed technical support is offered to users on the first call, it may be necessary for Technical or Application Management staff to be on the Service Desk.

This does not mean that the Service Desk becomes part of the Technical Management function. In fact, while they are on the Service Desk, they cease to be a part of the Technical Management or Application Management functions and become part of the Service Desk, even if only temporarily.

Technical Management

It provides detailed technical skills and resources needed to support the ongoing operation of the IT Infrastructure. Technical Management also plays an important role in the design, testing, release, and improvement of IT services. In small organizations, it is possible to manage this expertise in a single department, but larger organizations are typically split into a number of technically specialized departments.

In many organizations, the Technical Management departments are also responsible for the daily operation of a subset of the IT Infrastructure. The above figure shows that, although they are part of a Technical Management department, staff who perform these activities are logically part of the IT Operations Management function.

IT Operations Management

It is the function responsible for the daily operational activities needed to manage the IT Infrastructure. This is done according to the Performance Standards defined during Service Design. IT Operations Management has two functions that are unique and which are generally formal organizational structures. These are:

IT Operations Control is generally staffed by shifts of operators and which ensures that routine operational tasks are carried out. IT Operations Control will also provide centralized monitoring and control activities, usually using an Operations Bridge or Network Operations Centre and

Facilities Management refers to the management of the physical IT environment, usually Data Centres or computer rooms. In many organizations Technical and Application Management are co-located with IT Operations in large Data Centers. In some organizations, many physical components of the IT Infrastructure have been outsourced and Facilities Management may include the management of the outsourcing contracts.

Application Management

It is responsible for managing applications throughout their lifecycle. The Application Management function supports and maintains operational applications and also plays an important role in the design, testing and improvement of applications that form part of IT services.

Application Management is usually divided into departments based on the application portfolio of the organization, thus allowing easier specialization and more focused support.

Next, we will learn the objectives of each function.

Technical Management - Objectives

The objectives of Technical Management are to help plan, implement and maintain a stable technical infrastructure to support the organization’s business processes through:

  • Well designed and highly resilient, cost-effective technical topology.

  • The use of adequate technical skills to maintain the technical infrastructure in optimum condition

  • Swift use of technical skills to speedily diagnose and resolve any technical failures that do occur.

We have understood the objectives of each function. Let us learn about the roles of these functions.

Technical Management - Roles

Technical Management refers to the groups, departments or teams that provide technical expertise and overall management of the IT Infrastructure. Technical Management plays a dual role:

It is the custodian of technical knowledge and expertise related to managing the IT Infrastructure. In this role, Technical Management ensures that the knowledge required to design, test, manage and improve IT services is identified, developed and refined.

It provides the actual resources to support the ITSM Lifecycle. In this role, Technical Management ensures that resources are effectively trained and deployed to design, build and transition, operate and improve the technology required to deliver and support IT services.

By performing these two roles, Technical Management is able to ensure that the organization has access to the right type and level of human resources to manage technology and, thus, to meet business objectives. Technical Management refers to the groups, departments or teams that provide technical expertise and overall management of the IT Infrastructure.

Moving to the next section, let us look into the activities of technical management.

What are the activities of Technical Management?

Generic Technical Management activities are highlighted as follows:

  • Identifying the knowledge and expertise required to manage and operate the IT Infrastructure and to deliver IT services.

  • Documentation of the skills that exist in the organization, as well as those skills that need to be developed.

  • Initiating training programs to develop and refine the skills in the appropriate technical resources and maintaining training records for all technical resources.

  • Design and delivery of training for users, the Service Desk, and other groups.

  • Recruiting or contracting resources with skills that cannot be developed internally, or where there are insufficient people to perform the required Technical Management activities.

  • Research and development of solutions that can help expand the Service Portfolio or which can be used to simplify or automate IT Operations, reduce costs or increase levels of IT service.

  • Involvement in the design and building of new services. Technical Management will contribute to the design of the Technical Architecture and Performance standards for IT services.

  • In addition, it will also be responsible for specifying the operational activities required to manage the IT Infrastructure on an ongoing basis.

  • Involvement in projects, not only during Service Design and Service Transition but also for Continual Service Improvement or operational projects, such as Operating System upgrades, server consolidation projects or physical moves.

  • Availability and Capacity Management are dependent on Technical Management for engineering IT services to meet the levels of service required by the business. This means that modeling and workload forecasting are often done with Technical Management resources.

  • Assistance in assessing risk, identifying critical service and system dependencies and defining and implementing countermeasures.

  • Designing and performing tests for the functionality, performance, and manageability of IT services.

  • Managing vendors. Many Technical Management departments or groups are the only ones who know exactly what is required of a vendor and how to measure and manage them.

So far, we have looked at the activities of Technical Management. Let us proceed to study IT Operations Management Objective, Sub-functions, roles, and documentation.

IT Operations Management - Objectives

The objectives of IT Operations Management are to:

  • Maintain the status quo to achieve stability of the organization’s day-to-day processes and activities

  • Regular scrutiny and improvements to achieve improved service at reduced costs, while maintaining stability

  • Swift application of operational skills to diagnose and resolve any IT operations failures that occur

The next section talks about the subfunctions of IT Operations Management.

IT Operations Management - Subfunctions

IT Operations Management can be divided into IT Operations Control and Facilities Management. They can be described as follows:

IT Operations Control

It oversees the execution and monitoring of the operational activities and events in the IT Infrastructure. Operation control also performs specific tasks like:

  • Console Management

  • Job Scheduling

  • Backup and restore

  • Print and output management

Facilities Management

It refers to the management of physical IT environment, usually data centers or computer rooms and recovery sites together with all the power and cooling equipment.

IT Operations Management - Roles

The role of Operations Management is to execute the ongoing activities and procedures required to manage and maintain the IT Infrastructure so as to deliver and support IT Services at the agreed levels. Operations Control oversees the execution and monitoring of the operational activities and events in the IT Infrastructure.

This can be done with the assistance of an Operations Bridge or Network Operations Centre. Facilities Management refers to the management of the physical IT environment, typically a Data Centre or computer rooms and recovery sites together with all the power and cooling equipment.

Facilities Management also includes the coordination of large-scale consolidation projects, e.g. Data Centre consolidation or server consolidation projects. In some cases, the management of a data center is outsourced, in which case Facilities Management refers to the management of the outsourcing contract.

IT Operations must achieve a balance between these roles, which will require:

  • An understanding of how technology is used to provide IT services

  • An understanding of the relative importance and impact of those services on the business

  • Procedures and manuals that outline the role of IT Operations in both the management of technology and the delivery of IT services

  • A clearly differentiated set of metrics to report to the business on the achievement of Service objectives, and to report to IT managers on the efficiency and effectiveness of IT Operations

  • All IT Operations staff understands exactly how the performance of the technology affects the delivery of IT services

  • A cost strategy aimed at balancing the requirements of different business units with the cost savings available through optimization of existing technology or investment in new technology

  • A value, rather than cost, based Return on Investment strategy.

The next section talks about IT Operations Management – Documentation.

IT Operations Management - Documentation

A number of documents are produced and used during IT Operations Management. Following is a summary of some of the most important and does not include reports that are produced by IT Operations Management on behalf of other processes or functions.

Standard Operating Procedures (SOP)

It is a set of documents containing detailed instructions and activity schedules for every IT Operations Management team, department or group. These documents represent the routine work that needs to be done for every device, system or procedure. They also outline the procedures to be followed if an exception is detected or if a change is required.

Operations Log

It contains the record of all the activities conducted as part of IT Operations They can be used to confirm the successful completion of specific jobs or activities or an IT service was delivered as agreed They can also be used by Problem Management to research the root cause of incidents and they are the basis for reports on the performance of the IT Operations Management teams and departments.

Shift Schedules and Reports

Shift Schedules are documents that outline the exact activities that need to be carried out during the shift. They will also list all dependencies and activity sequences. There will probably be more than one Shift Schedule, where each team will have a version for its own systems.

It is important that all schedules are coordinated before the start of the shift. This is usually done by a person who is specialized in Shift Scheduling, with the help of scheduling tools.

Operations Schedules

The Operations Schedules are similar to Shift Schedules but cover all aspects of IT Operations at a high level. This schedule will include an overview of all planned changes, maintenance, routine jobs and additional work, together with information about upcoming business or vendor events.

The Operations Schedule is used as the basis for the Daily Operations Meeting and is the master reference for all IT Operations managers to track progress and detect exceptions.

In the next couple of sections, we learn about Applications Management objectives, roles, and activities.

Applications Management - Objectives

The objectives of Application Management are to support the organization’s business processes by helping to identify functional and manageability requirements for application software, and then to assist in the design and deployment of those applications and the ongoing support and improvement of those applications.

These objectives are achieved through applications that are well designed, resilient and cost-effective which ensures that the required functionality is available to achieve the required business outcome.

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Applications Management - Roles

Application Management is to applications what Technical Management is to the IT Infrastructure. Application Management plays a role in all applications, whether purchased or developed in-house. One of the key decisions that they contribute to is the decision of whether to buy an application or build it.

Once that decision is made, Application Management will play a dual role.

It is the custodian of technical knowledge and expertise related to managing applications. In this role Application Management, working together with Technical Management ensures that the knowledge required to design, test, manage and improve IT services is identified, developed and refined.

Application Management provides the actual resources to support the ITSM Lifecycle. In this role, Application Management ensures that resources are effectively trained and deployed to design, build and transition, operate and improve the technology required to deliver and support IT services.

Applications Management - Activities

ITSM processes and Applications Development processes have to be aligned as part of the overall strategy of delivering IT services in support of the business. Applications Development and Operations are part of the same overall lifecycle and both should be involved at all stages, although their level of involvement will vary depending on the stage of the lifecycle.

The activities of Application Management include:

Requirements phase

This is the phase during which the requirements for a new application are gathered, based on the business needs of the organization. This phase is active primarily during the Service Design phase of the ITSM Lifecycle.

Design phase

This is the phase during which requirements are translated into specifications. Design includes the design of the application itself, and the design of the environment, or operational model that the application has to run on.

Architectural considerations are the most important aspect of this phase since they can impact on the structure and content of both application and operational model. Architectural considerations for the application (design of the application architecture) and architectural considerations for the operation model (design of the system architecture) are strongly related and need to be aligned.

Build phase

In the Build phase, both the application and the operational model are made ready for deployment. Application components are coded or acquired, integrated and tested.

Deploy phase

In this phase, both the operational model and the application are deployed. The operational model is incorporated in the existing IT environment and the application is installed on top of the operational model, using the Release and Deployment Management process

Operate phase

In the Operate phase, the IT services organization operates the application as part of delivering a service required by the business. The performance of the application in relation to the overall service is measured continually against the Service Levels and key business drivers.

Optimize phase

In the Optimize phase, the results of the Service Level performance measurements are measured, analyzed and acted upon. Possible improvements are discussed and developments initiated if necessary. The two main strategies in this phase are to maintain and/or improve the Service Levels and to lower cost. This could lead to iteration in the lifecycle or to a justified retirement of an application.

Roles and Responsibilities

In the next few sections, we will be discussing the roles and responsibilities within each process of OSA. This involves generic roles such as:

  • Service Owner

  • Generic Process Owner

  • Process Manager

  • Process Practitioner

And process related roles of:

  • Incident Management

  • Problem Management

  • Request Fulfillment

  • Event Management

  • Access Management

Let’s learn about each of the above-mentioned roles in detail.

Service Owner Responsibilities (1 of 2)

Let’s begin with Generic service owner role.

To ensure that a service is managed with a business focus, the definition of a single point of accountability is absolutely essential to provide the level of attention and focus required for its delivery. The service owner is accountable for the delivery of a specific IT service.

The service owner is responsible to the customer for the initiation, transition and ongoing maintenance and support of a particular service and accountable to the IT director or service management director for the delivery of the service.

The service owner’s accountability for a specific service within an organization is independent of where the underpinning technology components, processes or professional capabilities reside. Service ownership is as critical to service management as establishing ownership for processes which cross multiple vertical silos or departments. It is possible that a single person may fulfill the service owner role for more than one service.

The service owner has the following responsibilities:

  • Ensuring that the ongoing service delivery and support meet agreed customer requirements

  • Working with business relationship management to understand and translate customer requirements into activities, measures or service components that will ensure that the service provider can meet those requirements

  • Ensuring consistent and appropriate communication with customer(s) for service related inquiries and issues

  • Assisting in defining service models and in assessing the impact of new services or changes to existing services through the service portfolio management process

  • Identifying opportunities for service improvements, discussing these with the customer and raising RFCs as appropriate

  • Liaising with the appropriate process owners throughout the service lifecycle

  • Soliciting required data, statistics and reports for analysis and to facilitate effective service monitoring and performance

  • Providing input in service attributes such as performance, availability etc.

  • Representing the service across the organization

  • Understanding the service (components etc.)

The remaining activities are discussed in the next section.

Service Owner Responsibilities(2 of 2)

The remaining activities can be described as follows:

  • Serving as the point of escalation (notification) for major incidents relating to the service

  • Representing the service in CAB meetings

  • Participating in internal and external service review

  • Ensuring that the service entry in the service catalog is accurate and is maintained

  • Participating in negotiating SLAs and OLAs relating to the service

  • Identifying improvement opportunities for inclusion in the CSI register

  • Working with the CSI manager to review and prioritize improvements in the CSI register

  • Making improvements to the service.

The service owner is responsible for continual improvement and the management of change affecting the service under their care. The service owner is a primary stakeholder in all of the underlying IT processes which enable or support the service they own.

Process Manager - Responsibilities

The process manager role is accountable for the operation management of a process. There may be several process managers for one process, for example, regional change managers or IT service continuity managers for each data center.

The process manager role is often assigned to the person who carries out the process owner role, but the two roles may be separate in larger organizations.

The process manager’s accountabilities include:

  • Working with the process owner to plan and coordinate all process activities

  • Ensuring all activities are carried out as required throughout the service lifecycle

  • Appointing people to the required roles

  • Managing resources assigned to the process

  • Working with service owners and other process managers to ensure the smooth running of services

  • Monitoring and reporting on process performance

  • Identifying improvement opportunities for inclusion in the CSI register

  • Working with the CSI manager and process owner to review and prioritize improvements in the CSI register

  • Making improvements to the process implementation.

Let us now move on to understand the role of a process practitioner in the next section.

Process Practitioner - Responsibilities

A process practitioner is responsible for carrying out one or more process activities. In some organizations, and for some processes, the process practitioner role may be combined with the process manager role. In others, there may be large numbers of practitioners carrying out different parts of the process.

The process practitioner’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out one or more activities of a process

  • Understanding how their role contributes to the overall delivery of service and creation of value for the business

  • Working with other stakeholders, such as their manager, co-workers, users, and customers, to ensure that their contributions are effective

  • Ensuring that inputs, outputs, and interfaces for their activities are correct

  • Creating or updating records to show that activities have been carried out correctly.

So far we have understood the roles and responsibilities of service owner, process owner, manager and practitioner. In the coming sections, we will discuss the roles and responsibilities under each process within OSA.

Key roles related to Incident Management Process

Let’s begin with the roles within Incident management process.

Incident management process owner

The incident management process owner’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process owner role for the incident management process

  • Designing incident models and workflows

  • Working with other process owners to ensure there is an integrated approach to the design and implementation of incident management, problem management, event management, access management and request fulfillment.

Incident management process manager

The incident management process manager’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process manager role for the incident management process

  • Planning and managing support for incident management tools and processes

  • Coordinating interfaces between incident management and other service management processes

  • Driving the efficiency and effectiveness of the incident management process

  • Producing management information

  • Managing the work of incident support staff (first- and second-line)

  • Monitoring the effectiveness of incident management and making recommendations for improvement

  • Developing and maintaining the incident management systems

  • Managing major incidents

  • Developing and maintaining the incident management process and procedures.

In many organizations, the role of incident manager is assigned to the service desk supervisor, although in larger organizations with high volumes a separate role may be necessary. In either case, it is important that the incident manager is given the authority to manage incidents effectively through first, second and third line analysts.

Let us discuss each of the analysts in detail.

First-line analyst

This role is that of providing first-line support for incidents when they occur using the incident management process. Key responsibilities include:

  • Recording incidents

  • Routing incidents to support specialist groups when needed

  • Analysing for correct prioritization, classification and providing initial support

  • Providing ownership, monitoring, tracking and communication of incidents

  • Providing resolution and recovery of incidents not assigned to support specialist groups

  • Closing incidents

  • Monitoring the status and progress towards resolution of assigned incidents

  • Keeping users and the service desk informed about incident progress

  • Escalating incidents as per the established escalation policies

Second-line analyst

Many organizations choose to have a second-line support group, made up of staff with greater (though still general) technical skills than the service desk – and with additional time to devote to incident diagnosis and resolution without interference from telephone interruptions.

Key responsibilities would be similar to the first-line analyst role. Such a group can handle many of the less complicated incidents, leaving more specialist (third-line) support groups to concentrate on dealing with more deep-rooted incidents and/or new developments etc.

Where a second-line group is used, there are often advantages to locating this group close to the service desk, to enable good communications and to ease movement of staff between the groups, which may be helpful for raining/awareness and during busy periods or staff shortages. A second line support manager (or supervisor if just a small group) will normally head this group.

Third-line analyst

Third-line support will be provided by a number of internal technical groups and/or third-party suppliers/maintainers. The list will vary from organization to organization but is likely to include:

  • Network support

  • Voice support (if separate)

  • Server support

  • Desktop support

  • Application management – it’s likely that there may be separate teams for different applications or application types, some of which may be external supplier/maintainers. In many cases the same team will be responsible for developing applications as well as support – it is therefore important that resources are prioritized so that support is given adequate prominence

  • Database support

  • Hardware maintenance engineers

  • Environmental equipment maintainers and suppliers

Moving on, let us understand the roles under problem management process.

Key roles related to Problem Management Process

Now we will get into a discussion about the number of roles that need to be performed in support of the problem management process. These roles are not job titles, and each organization will have to define appropriate job titles and job descriptions for their needs.

Problem Management Process Owner

The problem management process owner’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process owner role for the problem management process

  • Designing problem models and workflows

  • Working with other process owners to ensure there is an integrated approach to the design and implementation of problem management, incident management, event management, access management and request fulfillment.

Problem Management Process Manager

There should be a designated person (or, in larger organizations, a team) responsible for problem management. Smaller organizations may not be able to justify a full-time resource for this role, and it can be combined with other roles in such cases, but it is essential that it not just left to technical resources to perform.

There needs to be a single point of coordination and an owner of problem management activities. The problem management process manager’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process manager role for the problem management process

  • Planning and managing support for problem management tools and processes

  • Coordinating interfaces between problem management and other service management processes

  • Liaising with all problem resolution groups to ensure swift resolution of problems within SLA targets

  • Ownership and maintenance of the KEDB

  • Gatekeeper for the inclusion of all known errors and management of search algorithms

  • Formal closure of all problem records

  • Liaising with suppliers, contractors etc. to ensure that third parties fulfill their contractual obligations, especially with regard to resolving problems and providing problem-related information and data

  • Arranging, running, documenting and all follow-up activities relating to major problem reviews.

Problem Analyst

The actual solving of problems is likely to be undertaken by one or more technical support groups and/or suppliers or support contractors. These may include support resources who may work in many different areas but will come together to undertake problem resolution activities under the coordination of the problem manager.

The problem analyst’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Reviewing incident data to analyze assigned problems

  • Analysing problems for correct prioritization and classification

  • Investigating assigned problems through to resolution or root cause

  • Coordinating actions of others as necessary to assist with analysis and resolution actions for problems and known errors

  • Raising RFCs to resolve problems

  • Monitoring progress on the resolution of known errors and advising incident management staff on the best available workaround for incidents

  • Updating the KEDB with new or updated known errors and workarounds

  • Assisting with the handling of major incidents and identifying their root causes.

Where an individual problem is serious enough to warrant it, a dedicated problem management team should be formulated to work together in overcoming that particular problem. The problem resolver has a role to play in making sure that the correct number and level of resources are available in the team and for escalation and communication up the management chain of all organizations concerned.

Next, let us move on to learn about the roles involved in the process of request fulfillment.

Key roles related to Request Fulfilment Process

This part describes a number of roles that need to be performed in support of the request fulfillment process. These roles are not job titles, and each organization will have to define appropriate job titles and job descriptions for their needs.

Let’s begin with the details of the following key roles:

Request Fulfilment Process Owner

The request fulfillment process owner’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process owner role for the request fulfillment process

  • Designing request fulfillment models and workflows

  • Working with other process owners to ensure there is an integrated approach to the design and implementation of request fulfillment, incident management, event management, access management and problem management.

Request Fulfilment Process Manager

The request fulfillment process manager’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process manager role for the request fulfillment process

  • Planning and managing support for request fulfillment tools and processes

  • Coordinating interfaces between request fulfillment and other service management processes

  • Handling staff, customer and management concerns, requests, issues, and inquiries

  • Ensuring request fulfillment activities operate in line with service level targets

  • Reviewing and analyzing all request fulfillment reports to proactively seek improvements

  • Overseeing actions to obtain feedback from customers on the quality of request fulfillment activities

  • Assisting with activities to appropriately identify needed staffing resource levels to handle the demand for request fulfillment activities and services

  • Ensuring all authorized service requests are being fulfilled on a timely basis

  • Representing request fulfillment activities at CAB meetings

  • Reviewing the initial prioritization and authorization of service requests to determine accuracy and consistency.

Request Fulfilment Analyst

This role coordinates fulfillment of service requests to maintain high levels of satisfaction with IT services. It oversees, manages and coordinates all activities to respond to a service request and serves as a single point of contact until it has been fulfilled.

The request fulfillment analyst’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Providing a single point of contact and end-to end responsibility to ensure submitted service requests have been processed

  • Providing initial triage of service requests to determine which IT resources should be engaged to fulfill them

  • Communicating service requests to other IT resources that will be involved in fulfilling them

  • Escalating service requests in line with established service level targets

  • Ensuring service requests are appropriately logged.

Initial handling of service requests is commonly undertaken by the service desk and incident management staff. Eventual fulfillment of the service request will be undertaken by the appropriate service operation team(s) or departments and/or by external suppliers, as appropriate.

Often, facilities management, procurement and other business areas aid in the fulfilment of the service request. In most cases, there will be no need for additional roles or posts to be created.

In exceptional cases where a very high number of service requests are handled, or where the requests are of critical importance to the organization, it may be appropriate to have one or more of the incident management team dedicated to handling and managing service requests.

The next process roles and responsibilities to be discussed is Event management.

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Key roles related to Event Management Process

Now we will discuss the roles that need to be performed in support of the event management process. These roles are not job titles, and each organization will have to define appropriate job titles and job descriptions for their needs.

It is unusual for an organization to appoint an ‘event manager’, as events tend to occur in multiple contexts and for many different reasons. However, it is important that event management procedures are coordinated to prevent duplication of effort and tools.

Let’s begin to understand the different roles under this process:

Event Management Process Owner

The event management process owner’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process owner role for the event management process

  • Planning and managing support for event management tools and processes

  • Working with other process owners to ensure there is an integrated approach to the design and implementation of event management, incident management, request fulfillment, access management and problem management.

Event Management Process Manager

The event management process manager’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process manager role for the event management process

  • Planning and managing support for event management tools and processes

  • Coordinating interfaces between event management and other service management processes.

Lastly, let us understand the roles of access management process in the next section.

Key roles related to Access Management Process

The roles involved in the access management process are:

Access Management Process Owner

The access management process owner’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process owner role for the access management process

  • Designing access request workflows

  • Working with other process owners to ensure there is an integrated approach to the design and implementation of access management, incident management, event management, request fulfilment and problem management.

Access Management Process Manager

The access management process manager’s responsibilities typically include:

  • Carrying out the generic process manager role for the access management process

  • Planning and managing support for access management tools and processes

  • Coordinating interfaces between access management and other service management processes.

With this, we come to the end of lesson 8. Let’s summarize in the next section.

Summary

In this lesson, we discussed about the roles and activities of functions which included technical management, IT operations management and application management. We also looked at the generic roles and responsibilities and process roles within OSA.

The next lesson focuses on Technology and Implementation Considerations.

  • Disclaimer
  • PMP, PMI, PMBOK, CAPM, PgMP, PfMP, ACP, PBA, RMP, SP, and OPM3 are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

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