Advanced Pay Per Click (PPC) Certification Program

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Working with Quality Score: Part 2 Tutorial

3.2 Introduction

So beyond that then we have landing page issues. Now with landing page fixes, it's not just your landing page experience, it's below average you should fix the page. If you have a 10 quality score and a poor landing page experience, doesn't matter, you still have a 10 quality score. [00:00:19] You may change your landing page around, to work on it to make conversion rate standpoint completely different than quality scores. However, changing your page around, will not give you an 11 in this instance. So there's no 11 quality score. You've already got a ten. Smile. Be happy. And there's no reason to change landing pages. [00:00:39] Unless you're doing conversion testing. Now if you have, say a 5 quality score, and you're expected CTR and ad relevance are average, so neither one are above average, and your landing page experience is below average. In this case, you could either do ad copy testing to try to increase ad relevance or expected CTR and that could raise your quality scores. [00:01:06] Or you could change landing page around and do landing page tests to increase quality scores. So when you see two items as average, and landing page as below average, it's your choice if you want to do add testing, or if you want to do landing page testing. Now when we see that one of our two ad related items, either inspected C T R or ad relevance is above average and landing page is below average. [00:01:34] In this case, we do need to work on the landing page. It's ad testing by itself is probably not going to take us from a four up to a six or seven. So when you get into landing pages, you really want to look at the other components of quality score to see if they are currently average or above average Or even below average and they really need to be fixed before you decide if landing pages need to be changed or not. [00:02:02] Now if you see that your landing page is a poor experience one quick thing to do is go to the ad words keyword tool put in your landing page to make sure what you think your website is about is related to what google thinks your website is about. [00:02:19] Another good thing to look at is your bounce rates by device height for those keywords. So what you might find is that your landing page is below average for desktops but not for mobile. Or it's below average for mobile but not for desktops. So if you have Destination URLs that are different websites for mobile and for desktops. [00:02:47] You have two independent sites. Then you're just going to look at that site information individually because your URLs are different. If you use the same Landing Page by device, such as in response design. Then in analytics, and this is Google Analytics in this particular case. You can segment by your device and then look at your Bounce Rate by device. [00:03:13] To see if you have an 80% bounce rate on a mobile, but that same page is a 20% bounce rate on a desktop. That's telling you that your page is not doing well on mobile devices, and you really just need to change the mobile components of that page around or use a different landing page Just from mobile devices. [00:03:33] So if you see high bounce rates, there often correlated with lower landing page quality source. Things to look at are what's the content of the page, do you have things like, again, privacy policies, navigation elements, for factors But then look to see if there's a difference by device. If there is, just work on that device specific landing page. If there's not or you're not on multiple devices, then make sure what Google believes the content is, is what you think it is about. If those are the same, then it comes back to going and, and changing your content around on your landing page To help with something that's more relevant and more engaging for users to increase landing page relevance.

3.3 Landing Page Issues

Now there are times that you want to ignore quality scores. Number one is when you first open an account and you start it up, you don't have your quality scores. When you first add a keyword to your account, what you start with is the average of the other advertiser's quality score, tempered by your account history. So, if it's a brand new account, you don't have account history yet. So, you don't even have your own data. So, if you open a brand new account and you see all threes, don't panic and think it's going to be a terrible account. If you have less than 500 impressions on a keyword, you can pretty much ignore it. Now, when you're under 1,000 impressions still, but more than 500, think about your organization when you see bad quality scores. But don't go crazy yet. Now, when you get above 2000 impressions, you definitely have your own quality score. So you'd want to follow what we've talked about in this particular video for increasing them. And in that somewhere, usually between 700 and 2000 impressions, depending on how low volume the keyword is, is when you get your own quality score. So at 500, you really don't have your own quality score. If it's a low volume word, around 700 you do. If it's a higher volume word, it might take 1000 to 2000 impressions to get your quality score. But, once you have your own quality score, that's when you really want to work on it. Now, the exception to this, is bad landing pages. If you open an account and you immediately have bad landing pages, don't worry yet, your landing pages might not have been spidered yet. But if you open an account and it's been a few weeks, then you do have your own, at least landing page quality score experience that's being displayed. So, if you see a poor landing page then, then you need to look at your landing page content.

3.4 Ignore QS: Minimum Impressions

Now there are other times you want to ignore quality score. And this gets in to just some oddities in the algorithm. So in a case, maybe you have a single and a plural word, and the singular is a six or a ten, and the plural is a three or a four. That's just an algorithm issue, and it rarely is a problem. The exception being there, is when plural is commonly wholesale, and singular may be retail. Sometimes you see that variation, where wholesale and an ad copy for a plural can make a difference in quality score. However, for most times, that's, that's not a true statement in, when single isn't plurals are reversed are highly different, then don't worry about it. Other times it's for stemming issues. So maybe you have a keyword like garden tools, and it's a three quality score, and a keyword gardening tools is a ten. In that case, it's usually an algorithm issue because garden and gardening are so similar, and tools, of course, is the keyword for tools. That you could try and move in the keywords to new ad group and doing some testing for that particular keyword, but if that doesn't work, don't obsess, because everyone has the same issue as you. These issues are usually non-endemic of a single account issue. They're generally endemic of all keywords that all advertisers are using when these scenarios happen. [00:01:18]And the same rule for reverse words. The word accident attorney is a ten, but your word attorney accident is a three. When you see items like this same, same thing. You can try some testing if you want. And if you're in personal injury lawyers, well you're often doing $15 to $30 clicks, then it can be useful to try a little bit of testing to see if you can bump up the quality scores. But if you can't, again, this is fairly common to see accounts with a few of these issues where plurals and singulars are different or stemming or reverse words. It's a common thing to see across every account when it happens.

3.5 Ignore QS: Word Variations

Now there are other times you want to ignore quality score. And this gets in to just some oddities in the algorithm. So in a case, maybe you have a single and a plural word, and the singular is a six or a ten, and the plural is a three or a four. That's just an algorithm issue, and it rarely is a problem. The exception being there, is when plural is commonly wholesale, and singular may be retail. Sometimes you see that variation, where wholesale and an ad copy for a plural can make a difference in quality score. However, for most times, that's, that's not a true statement in, when single isn't plurals are reversed are highly different, then don't worry about it. Other times it's for stemming issues. So maybe you have a keyword like garden tools, and it's a three quality score, and a keyword gardening tools is a ten. In that case, it's usually an algorithm issue because garden and gardening are so similar, and tools, of course, is the keyword for tools. That you could try and move in the keywords to new ad group and doing some testing for that particular keyword, but if that doesn't work, don't obsess, because everyone has the same issue as you. These issues are usually non-endemic of a single account issue. They're generally endemic of all keywords that all advertisers are using when these scenarios happen. And the same rule for reverse words. The word accident attorney is a ten, but your word attorney accident is a three. When you see items like this same, same thing. You can try some testing if you want. And if you're in personal injury lawyers, well you're often doing $15 to $30 clicks, then it can be useful to try a little bit of testing to see if you can bump up the quality scores. But if you can't, again, this is fairly common to see accounts with a few of these issues where plurals and singulars are different or stemming or reverse words. It's a common thing to see across every account when it happens. So what you can do to see if you're in an industry like this is Google does not put what they deem low quality score words above the organic search results. So if you go into your keywords and then you do a segment of top versus other, if you have a lot of clicks and impressions at top, then you're most likely in an industry where a lot of people have 3's and 4's in them. And so in times like that, what you really want to shoot for are 4's. And 3's are essential, like 6's. The problem is 2's, your ads stop showing. So you really want to work on the 1's and 2's to get them to 3's and 4's. And in these types of accounts, you often see a few 6's and 7's, maybe a couple of 10's off in the branded terms, but the vast majority were just 3's. Now, that doesn't mean just because your account's all 3's, that you're in these industries. If your account's all 3's and you're in retail, you probably have, have an issue of quality scores and your ads are probably rarely shown on the top positions. This is more common in things like class action lawsuits where again, our average CPC at the top of the page is $155. Our average CPC on the side of the page is $176. And so, with words like these, you just really want to maintain those 3's and 4's. But again, if your CPCs are under $10, you're most likely not in one of these types of industries.

3.6 Ignore QS: Industry

The other times, is there some industries that have so much money flowing through them that the advertisers are buying every word, not doing a great job necessarily of optimizing everything and the industry as a whole gets low quality scores. Now, the issue that you run into in industries like this is that a 1 or a 2, your ad doesn't even show. [00:00:25] And then suddenly at a 3, your ad shows and a 4 is great. And these are often in high CPC industries. So for instance, the average CPC for this top keyword is $145 per click. Now the other keyword's $108 per click. So there's a lot of money flowing around and people are not very good about this, how they're optimizing these, because of the money involved. [00:00:51] So what you can do to see if you're in an industry like this is Google does not put what they deem low quality score words above the organic search results. So if you go into your keywords and then you do a segment of top versus other, if you have a lot of clicks and impressions at top, then you're most likely in an industry where a lot of people have 3's and 4's in them. [00:01:22] And so in times like that, what you really want to shoot for are 4's. And 3's are essential, like 6's. The problem is 2's, your ads stop showing. So you really want to work on the 1's and 2's to get them to 3's and 4's. And in these types of accounts, you often see a few 6's and 7's, maybe a couple of 10's off in the branded terms, but the vast majority were just 3's. Now, that doesn't mean just because your account's all 3's, that you're in these industries. If your account's all 3's and you're in retail, you probably have, have an issue of quality scores and your ads are probably rarely shown on the top positions. This is more common in things like class action lawsuits where again, our average CPC at the top of the page is $155. Our average CPC on the side of the page is $176. And so, with words like these, you just really want to maintain those 3's and 4's. But again, if your CPCs are under $10, you're most likely not in one of these types of industries.

3.7 Outliers in Quality Score

Another thing to look for for cost optimization is CTR issues by, say, different geographies and times of days and so forth, to see if there's outlier data you can take advantage of. So, when you look at this particular account, they were running two ads across most of the northeast. And we looked at the CTRs by geography. What happened is ad copy 1 in Pennsylvania, excluding Philadelphia, was a 16.4% click through rate. The second ad copy being run in Pennsylvania was only a 2.3% click through rate. So, so almost an eight times difference in CTRs by ad. [00:00:42] In Philly, the ads were kind of roughly the same, 5.5 and 8%. Then, in New Jersey, that ad that was doing 16.4% in Philadelphia, was doing 2.1% in New Jersey. But the second ad that was doing 2.3 in Pennsylvania, was doing 13.6 in New Jersey. So, all of a sudden, you had ads that matched regions really well. So, what this account did was they essentially took ad one and they put it in Pennsylvania, excluding Philadelphia and New Jersey. Then, ad copy two, they added New Jersey and Philadelphia. That's all they did was duplicate the campaigns. Same keywords. Changed the ads around by geography. That took their overall quality scores from roughly a 5.2 in the account basis to a 7.4. And the conversion rates didn't change. The conversion rates were very static in this particular instance. So, when you see massive differences in CTRs, not subtle things like 0.3 and 4% changes, but large percentage changes, you may be able to even do some campaign organization to increase quality scores.

3.8 Bing Quality Score

Now what we really talked about so far is Google. And we need to also just mention things possible, because it's a really big difference with Bing. So with Google, quality score is used to determine your actual CPCs and your ad rank in real time. Bing is completely different. Bing shows you quality scores after the fact, they're not used live in the auction. So with Bing what happens is they have a different set of numbers which you actually can't see as an advertiser which they use in the algorithm to determine ad ranks. So they still have something similar to quality score that's being used for ad rank purposes, but it's not the straight quality score you see in your account. So when you look at the proxy an advertiser can use to get an insight into how they're doing from an ad rank reason and a relevance basis for Bing's algorithm for ad ranks that you can't see it is keyword relevance. Keyword relevance is a really good proxy of seeing how you're doing. So if you see that your key relevance is good and your quality score is ten out of ten, then you don't need to do anything in Bing. If you see that your key relevance is good but your landing page is bad, then actually you're probably, by changing landing page, you're not going to affect your position in ad rank that much. Because it's a comparison to other advertisers. That doesn't mean you shouldn't fix your landing page. What Bing is trying to do is give advertisers insight in comparison to other advertisers of where to work on their accounts. So if you see landing page relevance bad and landing page user experience poor. In cases like that, you may want to look to see if you want to change them around because the content is often not quite related to the words and you can do better, but that change may not affect your positions in CPCs in Bing. Now usually what happens if you see keyword relevance is poor in Bing and you change your keyword relevance around, which again is mostly add to keyword, and it goes to good then usually in Bing you'll see a decrease in CPCs or an increase in positions or sometimes both but it's not absolute such as it in in AdWords. So Bing quality score is after the fact and is not what's used, but they do still have an ad rank formula. Google is live quality score at time of query to determine ad rank and your actual CPCs.

3.9 Balancing Quality Score with Revenue

Now when we talk about Quality Scores, we need to balance this with Revenue. Optimizing for Quality Scores is optimizing for search engine bank accounts, essentially. Because as your Quality Scores go up, your CTR goes up, you pay more to the search engines, so they make more money. Now, you can make more, too if you have good conversion rates. But a lot of times, I'll see people going to their accounts, they just filter show me all my Quality Scores 3 or less and select them all and delete all the keywords. Yeah, that'll raise your Quality Scores, but not necessarily your Revenue. What you need to look at is, say, I've got these keywords and their three Quality Scores, but they do really well from a Revenue standpoint. You're not going to delete them. You're just going to try to make them better. And you might have some words that you look at and say we can't make better, they're still Revenue positive, and you leave them there. So Quality Score, it's very important because it does raise your positions, lower your CPCs, makes sure everything is working inside your account. But don't improve Quality Scores that detriment of your account's Revenue. Same thing for ads you're keeping. So if you just saw this, Ad 1 with this keyword. So assume it's one keyword being used for these three ads, and when keyword is paired with Ad 1, it has a Quality Score 10. When the keyword is paired with Ad 2, it has a Quality Score of 5. When the keywords pair with Ad 3, it has a Quality Score of 7. Most people would say, well, I'm going to keep Ad 1. However, you don't have all the data yet. So what happens is CTR and Ad 1 is really high. And it's really high because it's using ad copy that's not overly qualifying to the user to weed out people who really aren't going to convert. So it has a $39 CPA. Now, Ad 2 is highly qualifying, and actually mentions the fact that it is for B to B items. So its CTR is almost half. Hence, why its Quality Score is almost half, as well. But its CPA is $24 as opposed to $39. And then we have Quality Score 7 on Ad 3, which is sort of a mixture of things in the middle. So if you have really bad Quality Scores and one of your goals is to increase Quality Scores, in this case, you're probably going to keep Ad 3 because its got a better Quality Score than your 5, but it also has a lower CPA than your 10. Now if all you care about is Revenue, you're going to keep Ad 2. That's your best CPA Ad. And so what often happens, especially in B2B industries, is you have to put some qualifiers in the ad, that you're a wholesaler, you're a manufacturer, you're a business-to-business company. And that lowers your click-through rates. However, it also lowers your Quality Scores. There's a balance between Quality Score and Revenue. And this is one of the advertisers' dilemma, is often balancing between the two of these of how do we keep our Quality Scores high enough that our ads are shown all the time? But how do we keep our ads qualified enough so we're not getting a lot of useless clicks? So if you do a test like this and you just care about Revenue, you're going to keep Ad 2 with the lowest Quality Score because it's your best CPA. You're not going to keep the best Quality Score, 1. So with Quality Scores, they're important. You really do have to look at them, but not at the detriments of your particular account's Revenue.

3.10 Where Should You Focus?

Now, the last thing to, to look at with quality score before we kind of recap here, is Impression Share. Where do you focus? So, what Impression Share is is a percentage of times that your ad was displayed and the reasons it was not displayed. So for campaign one here, our impression here is 57 %. That means that of all the times we could have been displayed, we're displayed 57 % of those times. Now there's two reasons you lose impressions. One is budget, so to gain those impressions you have to raise budget. The other one is rank. Your ad rank was too low to have the ad displayed. Now you could still be in average position one and lose impressions due to ad rank. If a searcher goes to a page and searches the same query over and over, often there's a few results but zero ads. Since there were zero ads shown, and even if you're position one, you are below zero. Of course, everybody is. And your ad was not displayed. Hence, you lost it due to ad rank. Some search partners only show two or four ads on a page. So, if you're position three and only four are displayed, you lost it due to rank. So usually with Impression Share, once you break 90 to 95% you really can't get more. But so, let's say we're losing a lot due to ad rank. So this ad rank is essentially made up of quality score and CPCs. So if we have budget issues, we need to of course raise budget if we want more impression. So again, we may not based upon our budgets. So, let's look at then, campaign one, we're losing 29% due to ad rank. So what we want to do is look at our quality scores by impression percentages, to see if most of our quality scores are low or high. So we've lost 29% of our impressions due to ad rank. Now we look at data and we see that the majority of our impressions are in the 3 and 4 range. So in this case, we want to focus on quality score more than bids for those words as it's an account overall, or campaign overall, item. Now, if we looked at the same data, and most of our quality scores were sevens, eights, nines, and tens. Then, to get more impressions and reclaim those ad ranks, we have to raise bids. So when you think about how to get more visibility into your account, it usually comes back to more budgets, higher CPCs, or higher quality scores. So by just using impression share to see what the issues are, were you're losing impressions. And then looking at quality score by impression percentages, you can tell if it's budget, data, or quality scores which will help you increase that campaigns overall impression share invisibility.

3.11 Recap

So, just to recap everything of where to spend your time with quality score. Your number one you want to diagnose where you have quality score issues. So, run a keyword report, put the information into a pivot table, find ad groups with high spends and low quality scores, and then find ad groups where most of the keywords are low quality scores and may never have any spends. So, when we isolate these ad groups that need help We want to first go to the ad group then, and see what the issue is. And what the issue, the diagnosis, it's either landing page or it's an ad aspect. So, if it's a ad aspect, we want to look at the ad group organization. Do the ads reflect the keywords? Can the keywords be broken down more granularly with that app? How's our CTRs and so if the issues then are not landing page related we're really designing ad tests. Now, if it's a landing page issue, ask yourselves, does a landing page reflect the keywords? If it doesn't we need to obviously change the landing page. We can look at the average keyword tool to see that the page looks like from Google standpoint. Linking his webmaster essential to make sure the page even works. We're not sending traffic to broken pages. We can look to see if it's a Device issue. Bounce rates based upon devices. And more often, finding issues to fix. It may be a privacy policy issue. It may be a 404 error. To change a landing page experience so that we can increase those quality scores. So, then if you don't have enough data. If you only have a few hundred ignore quality scores. Don't obsess over them yet. Then watch for outliers in CTR that you can use, some clear quality scores such as the geographic information I looked at earlier. Then what's most important I really think with quality scores is revenue nd your account goals matter more than quality score. If you do an ad test and ad one will increase your quality scores, ad two increases your revenue, most cases you should pick ad two. You can't forget about quality score. It's really important but don't optimize quality score at the expense of optimizing accounts revenue. And so now that we've looked through all this information you should be able to understand the quality score factors, diagnose your quality scores, find the places to fix them and then have ways and techniques of increasing the quality scores.

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