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Closing a Programme Tutorial

1 Closing a Programme

Hello and welcome to lesson 19 of the Managing Successful Programmes Certification course offered by Simplilearn. In the previous lessons, we have understood the lifecycle of a programme starting from the identification process to the definition process. The programme is executed in ‘managing the tranches’ and ‘delivering the capability’. ‘Realising the benefits’ process focuses on the benefits. The programme can be closed once all the benefits have been realised. This lesson focuses on the process, ‘closing a programme’. Let us begin with the objectives of this lesson in the next screen.

2 Objectives

By the end of this lesson, you will be able to: ? Describe the inputs, principle controls, key roles and the outputs of the ‘closing a programme’ process ? Discuss the checkpoints to verify programme closure ? Explain the reasons for closing a programme In the next screen, we will identify the position of the process, ‘closing a programme’, within the MSP® framework.

3 MSP Framework

‘Closing a programme’ is a part of the innermost circle of the MSP® framework. During this process, it is verified whether the programme can be closed or the programme organisation can be disbanded. It also allows and ensures support for operational units that have undergone transition. In the next screen, we will focus on an overview of the ‘closing a programme’ process.

4 Closing a Programme Introduction

In this screen, we will focus on inputs, principle controls, key roles and outputs of the ‘closing a programme’ process. The inputs to ‘closing a programme’ are management, boundary and governance baseline information. These are documents that will be reviewed and updated during the process. Other inputs comprise assurance review reports, end of tranche review, reasons for closure, lessons learnt and warranties and contracts related to the capabilities and outcomes delivered. The process is controlled by the Sponsoring Group, who is authorised to close the programme. The governance baseline also acts as a control for this process. The other controls are formal assurance review of programmes and reasons for the closure of the programme. The key roles in this process are the Sponsoring Group who endorses the closure and the Senior Responsible Owner or SRO who is accountable for the programme. Other responsibilities are shared by the Programme Board, Programme Manager, Business Change Manager or BCM and the Programme Office. The first step involved in ‘closing a programme’ is to ensure that support will continue after the programme has been closed. Next, the programme closure needs to be confirmed and notified. Once the closure is confirmed, the programme needs to be reviewed. After the review, programme information baselines are updated and finalised. Feedback regarding the programme is shared with corporate governance to ensure that the lessons learnt are not lost. Finally, the programme organisation and supporting functions are disbanded. The outputs of the ‘closing a programme’ process is the confirmation of programme closure. The programme teams are disbanded. Independent assurance review is conducted, which leads to updated programme baselines. The lessons learnt are recorded. The required benefits realisation activities will continue and the final information is handed over to the concerned teams for the same. The governance arrangements are prepared for projects that have not been closed. In the next screen, we will focus on the checkpoints to verify programme closure.

5 Checkpoints to Verify Programme Closure

A programme can be closed when it has delivered all the planned capabilities and the capabilities have been measured. These measures determine the success of a programme. For each capability delivered, the realised benefits will be analysed and compared with the estimation provided in the benefits profile. This will help in understanding whether or not the benefits have been successfully realised. To check if the programme can be closed, verify whether the blueprint has been delivered, the outcomes have been achieved, the business case has been satisfied and the benefits are self-sustaining and will serve the organisation without the programme’s support. The last tranche needs to be completed as per plan without outstanding issues or risks. Operations need to be in a stable state, that is, it should be free from risks that are unacceptable. There are other reasons responsible for closing a programme. We will discuss them in the next screen.

6 Other Reasons for Closing a Programme

A programme can be closed if the planned business case is no longer justified and it does not make business sense to continue the programme. This scenario can be a result of multiple factors which are both internal and external. A programme can also be closed if an organisation is unable to secure the necessary funding or resources to complete the programme. This could occur if key stakeholders discontinue supporting the programme. Next, a programme can be closed if it becomes unnecessary due to external circumstances. An example will be a programme to host commonwealth games, which had to be cancelled due to bad weather forecast for the entire month. A change in organisational strategy such that the programme does not suit the organisational strategy may also lead to programme closure. The 80/20 (Read as: eighty twenty) rule states that if the cost of the remaining programme does not make business sense when compared to the additional benefits it will realise, then the programme can be closed with whatever it has achieved so far. Finally, a programme can also be closed when alternative, cost-effective means to deliver the same outcome are available.

7 Summary

Let us summarise what we have learnt in this lesson: ? Some of the inputs to ‘closing a programme’ are management, boundary and governance baseline information. ? The ‘closing a programme’ process is controlled by the Sponsoring Group. ? The key roles in this process are the Sponsoring Group, SRO, Programme Manager, Programme Board, Business Change Manager and Programme Office. ? One of the outputs of the process is confirmation of programme closure. ? Delivery of blueprint, achievement of outcomes and other parameters can be tested before deciding to close the programme. ? A programme can be closed if it is realised that the planned business case is no longer justified. Next, we will focus on the steps involved in ‘closing a programme’.

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