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Identifying a Programme-Roles and Documents Used Tutorial

1 Identifying a Programme Roles and Documents Used

This lesson focuses on the various roles and responsibilities in each step of the ‘identifying a programme’ process. In addition, it makes you aware of the information that is available from the documents used in the process. Let us begin with the objectives of this lesson in the next screen.

2 Objectives

By the end of this lesson, you will be able to: ? Identify the roles and responsibilities in the ‘identifying a programme’ process ? Discuss the information available in the documents used in the same process In the following screen, we will review the roles and their responsibilities in the ‘identifying a programme’ process.

3 Roles and Responsibilities

The table on the screen depicts the roles and responsibilities of the Sponsoring Group, Senior Responsible Owner or SRO (read as S-R-O), Programme Manager and Business Change Managers or BCMs (read as B-C-Ms) in each step of the ‘identifying a programme’ process. In the table, ‘R’ represents those who are responsible to get the work done and ‘A’ represents those who are accountable or answerable for the programme’s success. ‘C’ represents those who are consulted and those who supports and have the information or capability and ‘I’ represents those who are informed or notified but not consulted. As observed from the table, the accountability or ‘A’ is mostly owned by the Sponsoring Group in the ‘identifying a programme’ process. The sponsoring Group needs to sponsor the programme, appoint the SRO and Programme Board and give approval to proceed based on the independent review of the programme brief. The two most important outputs of this process, programme brief and programme preparation plan, are prepared by the Programme Manager and BCMs represented by ‘R’, with the help of other expert resources. Even though it is prepared by others, the SRO is accountable for both these documents, as represented by ‘A’. In the next screen, we will focus on the documents used in the ‘identifying a programme’ process.

4 Documents Used in Identifying a Programme Purpose

The following are the purposes of the various documents used in the ‘identifying a programme’ process. The purpose of the programme mandate is to describe the required outcomes from the programme, based on the strategic and policy objectives. It is also called the strategic or embryonic business case in some organisations. The purpose of the programme brief is to assess whether the programme is viable and achievable. It is also referred to as the outline business case. Information stated here evolves into many documents including vision statement, risk and issue register, and business case in the “defining a programme” process. The purpose of the programme preparation plan is to provide details on how “defining a programme” process will be undertaken. In the next screen, we will focus on these documents in detail.

5 Documents Used in Identifying a Programme Information

The following are the information available in the documents used in the ‘identifying a programme’ process. Let us start with the programme mandate document. It should define the strategic objectives and initial budget for the programme. It should also make a note to include the programme’s context and other organisations (internal or external) likely to be affected by the programme. This will help to gauge how the programme fits in the corporate mission and goals. It should identify the critical success factors and the organisational improvements delivered by the programme. The document should specify the possible strategies and approaches for delivery, to maximise the chances of success. The document should provide the initial assurance arrangements to ensure that the work in the first phase is carried out in an orderly manner. The document should set expectations in terms of timescales, costs, benefits, constraints and deadlines that need to be met by the programme to be successful. It should refer to external drivers that are driving the programme such as competition from other similar firms and legislation changes and summary of the “as-is” state to differentiate between the current scenario and the future scenario. Next, let us discuss the programme brief document. The contents of this document include the outline vision statement with the clear statement of the goal of the programme. It should also include the outline description of benefits, estimate of when they are likely to be achieved and measurement standards for them, so as to ensure the programme team is aware of what needs to be achieved. It further includes estimated costs, timescales and efforts required to set up, manage and run the programme throughout its lifecycle. This will give a baseline to compare the benefits if the programme is profitable. If expenses are more than the estimated benefits, it makes no sense to proceed with the programme. It should include the list of identified risks, constraints, conflicts and issues identifiable in the beginning of programme. It should also include options for delivery known at that stage including the impact of “do-nothing” state. This will help to realise the gains from the programme and they can also be shared with the stakeholders to gather more support for the programme. The programme brief can also include the initial list of candidate projects along with rough timescales. If some of the current projects need to be terminated, they should be listed along with reasons. The document should include a complete assessment of the current state, current business operations and performance in impacted areas. These details are useful when the programme team moves to prepare the boundary and governance documents in ‘defining a programme’. Let us now focus on the programme preparation plan. The contents of this document mention the required resources, including future management team and where they will be sourced from, for example, the BCMs and Programme Manager. It should also identify specific skill sets needed for the next process. It should define the boundaries within which the teams will work to minimise conflicts. It should provide the descriptions of deliverables from the definitions provided in the programme mandate. It should identify the governance and controls under which the defining team will work. Governance will ensure that a proper reporting and issue escalation process is in place. The programme preparation plan also defines assurance arrangements for the “defining a programme” process. These defined arrangements ensure quality outputs. The programme preparation plan should also define the schedule of activity in the next process, “defining a programme”, to achieve outputs. Membership of the Programme Board will also be suggested by the document. Most importantly, it should mention the estimated effort and cost associated with the programme plan. Note that all the arrangements and estimates are only for the next process, ‘defining a programme’, and not the whole programme.

6 Summary

Let us summarise what we have learnt in this lesson: The roles and responsibilities in ‘identifying a programme’ is marked using the RACI method where R represents those who are responsible to get the work done, A represents those who are accountable, C represents those who are consulted and I represents those who are informed. Sponsoring Group is mostly accountable for the entire ‘identifying a programme’ process. The documents used in the process are programme mandate, programme brief and programme preparation plan. The programme preparation plan is used to provide details on how the ‘defining a programme’ process will be undertaken. Next, we will look at a few questions based on the lessons covered so far.

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