Tutorial Playlist

Cyber Security Tutorial: A Step-by-Step Guide

Overview

What is Cybersecurity?

Lesson - 1

Cyber Security for Beginners

Lesson - 2

How to Become a Cybersecurity Engineer?

Lesson - 3

What is Ethical Hacking?

Lesson - 4

What is Penetration Testing?: A Step-by-Step Guide

Lesson - 5

What Is SQL Injection: How to Prevent SQL Injection

Lesson - 6

How to Become an Ethical Hacker?

Lesson - 7

What Is a Firewall and Why Is It Vital?

Lesson - 8

The Complete Know-How on the

Lesson - 9

A Definitive Guide to Learn the SHA 256 Algorithm

Lesson - 10

What Is a Ransomware Attack and How Can You Prevent It?

Lesson - 11

A Look at the Top 5 Programming Languages for Hacking

Lesson - 12

The Most Informative Guide on What Is an IP Address?

Lesson - 13

The Best Ethical Hacking + Cybersecurity Books

Lesson - 14

10 Types of Cyber Attacks You Should Be Aware in 2022

Lesson - 15

The Top Computer Hacks of All Time

Lesson - 16

Top 6 Cyber Security Jobs in 2022

Lesson - 17

The Best Guide to The Top Cybersecurity Interview Questions

Lesson - 18

What Is a Brute Force Attack and How to Protect Our Data Against It?

Lesson - 19

The Top 8 Cybersecurity Skills You Must Have

Lesson - 20

Your Guide to Choose the Best Operating System Between Parrot OS vs. Kali Linux

Lesson - 21

All You Need to Know About Parrot Security OS

Lesson - 22

The Best and Easiest Way to Understand What Is a VPN

Lesson - 23

What Is NMap? A Comprehensive Tutorial for Network Mapping

Lesson - 24

What Is Google Dorking? Your Way to Becoming the Best Google Hacker

Lesson - 25

Your Best Guide to a Successful Cyber Security Career Path

Lesson - 26

The Value of Python in Ethical Hacking and a Password Cracking Tutorial

Lesson - 27

The Best Guide to Understand What Is TCP/IP Model?

Lesson - 28

What Are Keyloggers and Its Effect on Our Devices?

Lesson - 29

Best Guide to Understand the Importance of What Is Subnetting

Lesson - 30

Your Guide to What Is 5G and How It Works

Lesson - 31

How to Crack Passwords and Strengthen Your Credentials Against Brute-Force

Lesson - 32

A Look at ‘What Is Metasploitable’, a Hacker’s Playground Based on Ubuntu Virtual Machines

Lesson - 33

One-Stop Guide to Understanding What Is Distance Vector Routing?

Lesson - 34

Best Walkthrough for Understanding the Networking Commands

Lesson - 35

Best Guide to Understanding the Operation of Stop-and-Wait Protocol

Lesson - 36

The Best Guide to Understanding the Working and Importance of Go-Back-N ARQ Protocol

Lesson - 37

What Are Digital Signatures: A Thorough Guide Into Cryptographic Authentication

Lesson - 38

The Best Spotify Data Analysis Project You Need to Know

Lesson - 39

A One-Stop Solution Guide to Understand Data Structure and Algorithm Complexity

Lesson - 40

Your One-Stop Guide ‘On How Does the Internet Work?’

Lesson - 41

An Introduction to Circuit Switching and Packet Switching

Lesson - 42

One-Stop Guide to Understanding What Is Network Topology?

Lesson - 43

A Deep Dive Into Cross-Site Scripting and Its Significance

Lesson - 44

The Best Walkthrough on What Is DHCP and Its Working

Lesson - 45

A Complete Look at What a Proxy Is, Along With the Working of the Proxy Server

Lesson - 46

A Detailed Guide to Understanding What Identity and Access Management Is

Lesson - 47

The Best Guide to Understanding the Working and Effects of Sliding Window Protocol

Lesson - 48

The Best Guide That You’ll Ever Need to Understand Typescript and Express

Lesson - 49

Express REST API

Lesson - 50

All You Need to Know About Express JS Middleware

Lesson - 51

An Absolute Guide to Know Everything on Expressions in C

Lesson - 52

A Definitive Guide on How to Create a Strong Password

Lesson - 53

Ubuntu vs. Debian: A Look at Beginner Friendly Linux Distribution

Lesson - 54

Your One-Stop Guide to Learn Command Prompt Hacks

Lesson - 55

Best Walkthrough to Understand the Difference Between IPv4 and IPv6

Lesson - 56

What Is Kali NetHunter? A Deep Dive Into the Hackbox for Android

Lesson - 57

A Perfect Guide That Explains the Differences Between a Hub and a Switch

Lesson - 58

The Best Guide to Help You Understand What Is Network Security

Lesson - 59

What Is CIDR? And Its Importance in the Networking Domain

Lesson - 60
An Absolute Guide to Know Everything on Expressions in C

Expressions in C programing language combine operands, operators, and variables. The evaluations of an expression in C happen according to the operator's precedence. Once the expressions are processed, the result will be stored in the variable.   

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What Are Expressions in C?

Expressions are the combination of variables, operands, and operators. The result would be stored in the variable once the expressions are processed based on the operator's precedence.

Expression Example:

c=a+b

a-b+c

a+b-(a*c)

Expressions_In_C_1

Types of Expressions in C 

  • Arithmetic expressions
  • Relational expressions
  • Logical expressions
  • Conditional expressions

You will go through each of them in detail.

Arithmetic Expressions:

The arithmetic expression is evaluated in specific order considering the operator's precedence, and the result of an expression will be based on the type of variable.

Example: 

Expressions_In_C_2.

From the given above arithmetic expressions example, let's consider the values of operands to be a=2,b=3, and c=4.

After substitution of values into the given expression, we get:

Z = 2 + 3 - (2 * 4)

Below given steps are in order of precedence in which the operators of an expression must be evaluated.

Step1: First, Priority is given to the parenthesis, so whatever is inside the parenthesis will be evaluated first, a*c (2*4 = 8).

Step 2: The next level of precedence is given to + and - operator, so next a+b (2+3 = 5) is evaluated 

Step 3: a+b will be subtracted from a*c i.e; 5 - 8 = -3.

Step 4: The final value after evaluation of an arithmetic expression will be stored into the variable Z, according to the example value three is stored into the variable Z that is z = -3

Look at the below-given figure to understand the arithmetic expressions evaluation in a better way.

Expressions_In_C_3

Example Program Using Arithmetic Expressions:

#include <stdio.h>

void main()

{

    int a=2,b=3,c=4,z;

    z=a+b-(a*c);

    printf("Result= %d",z);

Output:

Expressions_In_C_4

Followed by arithmetic expressions, you will learn all about relational expressions.

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Relational Expressions:

Relational operators >, <, ==,!= etc are used to compare 2 operands. Relational expressions consisting of operands, variables, operators, and the result after evaluation would be either true or false.

Example:

C = a > b

a*b == a+b

a+b*c > a*b+c

Expressions_In_C_5

From the given above relational expression example, let's consider the values of operands to be a=3, b=2, and c=1.

After substitution of values into the given expression, we get:

Z = 3 * 2 > 3 + 1

Below given steps are in order of precedence in which the operators of an expression must be evaluated.

Step 1: It first evaluates a*b (3*2=6).

Step 2: Next, computer evaluate the expression a+c (3+1 =4)

Step 3: Then the values are compared with each other, that is, six> 4

Since the value six is greater than 4, the output will be true; in C programming, true is represented by one, and false represents zero.

Step 4: The result one is stored in the variable Z

Look at the below-given figure to understand the evaluation of the relational expression in a better way.

Expressions_In_C_6.

Example Program Using Relational Expressions:

#include <stdio.h>

void main()

{

    int a=3,b=2,c=1,z;

    z=a*b>a+c;

    printf("Result= %d",z);

}

Output:

Expressions_In_C_7

After relational expressions, you have logical expressions.

Logical Expressions:

Relational expressions and arithmetic expressions are connected with the logical operators, and the result after an evaluation is stored in the variable, which is either true or false.

Example:

C= (a+b)>c && a<b 

a>b || b>a

From the given below logical expression example, let's consider the values of operands to be a=2, b=4, and c=3.

Expressions_In_C_8

After substitution of values into the given expression, we get:

Z = (2 + 4) > 3 && 2 < 4

Below given steps are in order of precedence in which the operators of an expression must be evaluated.

Step 1: Computer first evaluates the expression a+b (2+4=6) and then checks whether a+b is greater than c (6>3), which is true.

Step 2: It then evaluates a < b (2<4) true.

Step 3: Finally, it evaluates both expressions using the logical AND operator, represented by the symbol &&. The result true(1) is stored in the variable Z.

Look at the below-given figure to understand the evaluation of the logical expression in a better way.

Expressions_In_C_9

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Example Program Using Logical Expressions:

#include <stdio.h>

void main()

{

    int a=2,b=4,c=3,z;

     z= (a+b) >c && a<b; 

    printf("result=%d",z);

}

Output:

/Expressions_In_C_10

Up next, we have conditional expressions.

Conditional Expressions:

The general syntax of conditional expression is:

Exp1? Exp2: Exp3

From the given above expressions, the first expression (exp1) is conditional, and if the condition is satisfied, then expression2 will be executed; otherwise, expression3 will be performed.

Example:

2<3? 2 : 3

a*b>c ? true : false

From the given below conditional expressions example, let's consider the values of operands to be a=5, b=3, and c=1.

Expressions_In_C_11.

After substitution of values into the given expression, we get:

Z = (5 * 3) < 1 ? ‘true’ : ‘false’

Below given steps are in order of precedence in which the operators of an expression must be evaluated.

Step 1: First, it evaluates the expression1 a*b (5*3=15).

Step 2: Next, it checks whether the condition is satisfied, a*b < c (15 > 1), false.

Step 3: Since the condition is false, expression3 will be executed and return the value one as an output stored in the variable Z.

Look at the below-given figure to understand the evaluation of the conditional expressions in a better way.

Expressions_In_C_12. 

#include <stdio.h>

void main()

{   

    int a=5, b=3, c=1,z;

    z = (5 * 3) < 1 ? 1 : 0;

    printf("Result = %d",z);

}

Output:

Expressions_In_C_13

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Next Steps

"Data Structures in C" can be your next topic. So far, you have learned the expressions in the C programming language. The following fundamentals will be the data structures and the varieties in data structures used for different purposes.

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If you have any questions regarding the "Expressions in C" tutorial, please let us know in the comment section below. Our experts will get back to you ASAP.

About the Author

Hoor Sania SHoor Sania S

Hoor is a Bangalore-based Research Analyst. She has a knack for learning computer languages and technologies. In her free time, she enjoys dancing and singing.

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