Have you spotted surveys on the websites you visit lately? They’re the small windows that pop up in the corner of a web page you’re browsing, and they seem to be appearing more frequently. Turns out, it’s for good reason — they provide real-time user feedback, help businesses improve their sites, and can even generate leads. But not all are created equal, so we’ve gathered some of the more creative website surveys to explain why they work so well.

Databox

databox

Databox is both smart and creative with their website surveys, like this one that displays at the end of their blog posts. For one, the copy continues the momentum of the visit by inviting you to have their next blog post sent to you. This is brilliant because by sending you the upcoming post, they don’t have to hope you come back on your own and you become a subscriber to the blog for the foreseeable future. Two, the photo of the smiling Databox representative is a nice touch because it feels more personal and less sales-y. 

Paul Ekman Group   

ekman

Paul Ekman Group aligns its surveys with the topics of the pages, which makes them feel more personalized. For instance, on this page about micro expressions, the survey refers to micro expressions. It’s highly relevant, making it more likely for visitors to interact. For those who select “Yes,” they’re asked to submit an email address and receive a special offer in return. This website survey is a clever way to generate leads and delight customers at the same time.

MailChimp

mailchimp

MailChimp uses its website surveys in yet another creative way — to measure customer satisfaction and loyalty. The messaging is brief and unassuming, yet makes it clear what the primary goal is, and that’s simply to rate how likely it is for the visitor to recommend the service to someone. Another reason this works — it can help businesses identify potential brand advocates as well as those who are likely to move away from the service.

Colgate

colgate

Colgate’s survey pops up when you’re browsing product pages, and it can be an inexpensive way to evaluate user behavior on the site. It can also help gauge where users are at in their buyer journeys while on these pages, helping inform the brand while influencing decisions about what to change on the site and how to make the experience even better for visitors.

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Google

google

Yes, even Google wants to hear from its visitors, and this survey is a great example of how to gather feedback. Businesses can use a survey on their website to monitor how people are feeling about the information given, and it doesn’t have to stop at a single question. For example, you could have a follow-up question appear once someone answers this type of satisfaction inquiry, and that would give you even more valuable information. 

Learn More About Design Thinking and Digital Marketing

Creative website surveys are just one way to apply what you learn about visitors to the website. If you want to dig deeper, check out Simplilearn’s Design Thinking Certification Course. You’ll master the concepts of design thinking, a powerful problem-solving process that involves a deep understanding of customer needs. To further apply your design thinking skills to digital marketing, check out Simplilearn's Post Graduate Program in Digital Marketing, in partnership with Purdue University and co-created with Facebook.

About the Author

Rob SandersRob Sanders

Rob Sanders is a digital marketing veteran with over 20 years of experience. During that time, Rob has helped a wide range of companies utilize new and emerging technologies to increase sales and profitability. As founder of RSO Consulting, Rob helps clients maximize their digital marketing efforts via SEO, SEM, SMO, and Web Analytics. He is responsible for many facets of the web analytics value chain, from identifying business goals and objectives to developing strategies and translating those into Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Rob also teaches digital marketing and analytics classes throughout the U.S. and abroad. As a contributor for Simplilearn, Rob creates expert thought leadership content on a variety of digital marketing and analytics topics.

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  • *According to Simplilearn survey conducted and subject to terms & conditions with Ernst & Young LLP (EY) as Process Advisors