You can put your most essential apps in the cloud (think Google and Facebook) and know you will always have a connection. Just as a server can remain online and run forever, so can a virtual machine in the cloud.

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Virtual Servers - Pros and Cons

Virtual servers in the cloud are easier to manage. I tend to set up VMs on my server's cloud and remove them. There's a lot less maintenance for the cloud, and this is especially true in a hybrid cloud configuration.

Virtual servers in the cloud are inexpensive. Amazon AWS provides unlimited virtual servers for up to 30 hours for $0.12 per hour. With virtual servers in the cloud, it's possible to enjoy virtual servers for many months without spending much money.

You can keep your entire virtual server in the cloud. There's no need to build virtual servers constantly. I know it's easier to keep servers online when you can maintain them yourself, but when you need more servers to test, you might be better off building your virtual servers.

There are two main benefits of this approach”

  • Access to the entire cloud. If you need access to more servers, you can build them in the cloud and then scale them out. The same goes for memory and storage space.
  • Convenience. Connecting to a cloud service on your phone is not something you can do with your server in a server room.

After all, if your server dies, you can't just retrieve the virtual server. It would help if you also found your virtual servers, including what applications are running, and installed the operating system and software to get your virtual server back. This process occurs almost instantly if the virtual server runs in the cloud.

I would argue that you can get much more, and much more conveniently, with virtual cloud servers.

Yes, virtual servers in the cloud have their limitations. For example, a virtual server in the cloud won't have access to a fully stocked IT department. You will need to ensure your virtual servers are upgraded as you upgrade the cloud servers you're connected to.

A virtual server in the cloud will be limited to a particular virtual operating system. In addition, it's unlikely that you will have access to an email server and any applications that can run on that operating system.

You will also lose the portability of the virtual server you build yourself. That is because the virtual server in the cloud is tied to the hardware where it's located, which is usually a virtual machine in Amazon AWS.

You will lose the ability to control your virtual servers from your computer. There will be limitations to taking virtual servers off the cloud. I will have to turn my virtual server off if I don't have an active cloud server to put it on. That is true for all virtual servers you build in the cloud.

In short, the answer to whether virtual servers in the cloud are a good idea for your business is yes.

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Working With Azure Lightsail

Connecting Virtual Cloud Server to AWS Lightsail is easy. All you need is a Virtual Network Interface (VNI) and DNS.

If you've worked with Virtual Network Interface before, let's make it easy to navigate through the interface. You'll notice that Virtual Cloud Server is connected to Virtual Network Interface like any other VM. With this connection, you can directly go to Virtual Network Service, Virtual Network Services, Virtual Cloud Server, and Virtual Network Services.

To configure it, you can start the Service Provider Interface (SPI) from AWS Virtual Network Service (where you want to connect Virtual Cloud Server).

In the API Console, make sure you are using the DNS for Virtual Network Service. Change DNS settings from DNS.org to Virtual Network Service.

Do the same to Virtual Network Service. Change DNS from the DNS provider.

Finally, go back to the API Console (API Layer for Virtual Network Service).

Then configure DNS for Virtual Network Service. Final steps: Configure Virtual Network Service. Configure Virtual Cloud Server.

Wait a while to execute the commands from the API Console (API Layer). Then connect Virtual Network Service to Virtual Cloud Server. You'll see Virtual Cloud Server as the root interface in the Interface Options.

Working With Azure Virtual Machines

If you want to work with Azure Virtual Machines (VM), you'll need a Virtual Network Interface (VNI) from Azure. It's easy to create a VNI. You can download an ISO from Microsoft or set up a Virtual Network on Azure. Go to Virtual Network Service (API Layer for Virtual Network Service) from Azure Service Catalog.

Here is where you create a Virtual Network Interface. Using the CLI, go to Virtual Network Service to create a Virtual Network Interface for Virtual Network Service.

On the interface dashboard, choose Virtual Network from Virtual Network Services.

Use the Windows API (Internet Interface Services) to change Virtual Network from Virtual Network Service to Virtual Network.

In the UI dashboard, you will see Virtual Network as the parent for Virtual Network Service. When ready, go back to the API Console and configure DNS. Finally, connect Virtual Network Service to Virtual Cloud Server (API Layer for Virtual Network Service).

Final steps:

  • Configure Virtual Network Service. Configure Virtual Cloud Server.
  • Connect Virtual Cloud Server to Virtual Network. You can use DNS for Virtual Cloud Server.
  • Connect Virtual Network Server to Virtual Cloud Server. You can use DNS for Virtual Cloud Server.

Work With Azure Virtual Machines and Virtual Network

Connecting Virtual Cloud Server to Azure Virtual Machines is simple. Virtual Cloud Server connects to Virtual Network Service like any other VM. The only difference is that Virtual Network Server is the VM for Virtual Cloud Server.

Connect Virtual Cloud Server to Virtual Network Services. Use DNS for Virtual Cloud Server. Using Google Cloud Platform Computer Engine for Virtual Machines

If you want to work with Google Cloud Platform (GCP) Virtual Machines (VM), you'll need a Virtual Network Interface (VNI).

You can create it using Virtual Network Services (API Layer for Virtual Network Service).

The first time you connect Virtual Network Service to Virtual Network Interface, you'll see Virtual Network Service as the root interface.

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Summary of Building Virtual Servers Such as AWS, Azure, and GCP

Developing Virtual Servers such as AWS, Azure, and GCP is much simpler. It uses Azure Virtual Machines (VM) and Virtual Network Service for GCP.

Using Virtual Network Interface for Virtual Network Service, you can connect Virtual Network Service to Virtual Cloud Server (API Layer for Virtual Network Service). The API is the most important.

It's much more straightforward. If you use API for Virtual Network Service, you won't use DNS for Virtual Cloud Server or Virtual Network Service.

If you want to learn in more detail about virtual servers in the cloud and other aspects of cloud computing, Simplilearn offers a variety of courses and programs to teach you the concepts and skills. One example is the Caltech Cloud Computing Bootcamp that Simplilearn offers in conjunction with Caltech’s Center for Technology and Management Education. This comprehensive program, delivered entirely online, takes you from cloud basics to advanced cloud computing skills in just six months.

About the Author

Matthew DavidMatthew David

Matt is a Digital Leader at Accenture. His passion is a combination of solving today's problems to run more efficiently, adjusting focus to take advantage of digital tools to improve tomorrow and move organizations to new ways of working that impact the future.

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